"THE BLACKER THE BERRY THE SWEETER THE JUICE/
I SAY THE DARKER THE FLESH,THEN THE DEEPER THE ROOTS!"
TUPAC SAYS

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME!

"BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL" -NEW YORK CITY STREET SAYING

"BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!
BROWN IS HIP,
PUERTO RICAN IS OKAY
BUT white AIN'T S___T!"

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY OOO!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY OOO!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY OOO!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY OOO!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME
BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY SUPREME

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTY

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WE MUST HAVE A BLACK STANDARD OF BEAUTY BASED ON THE BLACK SKINNED BLACKEST WOMAN

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

BLACKAMERIKKKAN face genocide? /black-americans-genocide-open-season

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/15/black-americans-genocide-open-season

BLACK Egypt oooo!- Book of the Dead

https://face2faceafrica.com/article/inside-ancient-egypts-book-of-the-dead-that-reveals-the-trials-the-dead-goes-through-during-the-passage-to-the-afterlife

Aso Oke ooo!- The MOST Beautiful Cloth in the World!

https://thenationonlineng.net/glamour-with-aso-oke-attire/

Get the Money,Honey!-UK BLACK Wins Suit for Racism O!

https://face2faceafrica.com/article/black-soldier-wins-suit-against-british-army-after-superiors-confused-him-with-another-black

4- BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES oooo!-Back to the Top Where They Belong ooo!

https://newsone.com/playlist/south-africa-wins-miss-universe-black-beauty-pageant-winners/

Sister Cardi-B speaks on Coming Back to AFRICA oooo!-Nigeria ATI GHANA

https://www.dailytrust.com.ng/livespot-x-festival-im-coming-nigeria-ghana-cardi-b-tells-fans.html

IFA Priest is an Oba oooo!-From Tribune Newspaper

https://tribuneonlineng.com/im-both-an-ifa-priest-and-oba-one-shouldnt-hinder-the-other-olu-ibogun/

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES OOOO!-The Oueens of all Beauty are raising to Their Original Top position as in the Beginning o!

BLACK SKINNED BEAUTIES OOOO!-The Oueens of all Beauty are raising to Their Original Top position as in the Beginning o!

https://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/latest/amp30181615/miss-universe-win-historic-for-black-women/

Saturday, December 07, 2019

Lynching ooo!-/before-emmett-till-17-year-old-jesse-washington-was-roasted-to-death-by-a-white-mob-and-captured-on-camera-for-postcards

https://face2faceafrica.com/article/before-emmett-till-17-year-old-jesse-washington-was-roasted-to-death-by-a-white-mob-and-captured-on-camera-for-postcards

Friday, December 06, 2019

The In Search Of Uhuru Tour

Please Join Us For A Trip Of A Lifetime. If You Are Interested, Please Contact Us. You Don't Want To Miss Out.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Senegal has largest Black Museum oooo!

Face2Face Africa BY MILDRED EUROPA TAYLOR, December 03, 2018,  Senegal opens the world’s largest museum of black civilisations with China’s help - the Museum of Black Civilizations in Senegal . After 52 years of waiting, Senegal is set to open what has been described as the largest museum of black civilization ever on December 6 in the capital, Dakar. Spread over an area of 14,000 m2 with a capacity of 18,000 pieces of art, the Museum of Black Civilizations, which will be used for the conservation of cultural values of the black people and for the presentation of Africa to the world, was built thanks to a donation from China amounting to $34.6 million, according to officials. Senegal’s late president Leopold Sedar Senghor was the first to propose the idea of a museum about the civilisations of black Africa during a world festival of black artists in Dakar in 1966.  Senegalese President Abdoulaye Wade laid the foundation stone in the capital Dakar but works were suspended during a political change until the subsequent leader, Macky Sall set the project rolling between December 2013 and December 2015. “This building, just like all others within the Cultural Park will not be considered as a Senegalese monument, but an African monument,” Wade said when the first stone was laid. Finally, the doors of the museum will be opened with an exhibition on the theme “African civilizations: continuous creation of humanity”. “On two levels, visitors will travel from the Neolithic to the multiplicity of African cultures, through the Iron Age, to understand the contributions of Africa to the scientific and technical heritage. The director of the museum boasts a modern scenography, with the latest technologies, to dialogue paintings, sculptures, masks and some masterpieces, as a piece of one of the major figures of the plastic arts of Mali, Abdoulaye Konaté, and a monumental baobab of 112 meters high made by a Haitian representative of the diaspora,” a report by News Africa said. Museum of Black Civilizations — Twitter Essentially, the museum features vestiges of the first hominids who appeared in Africa several million years ago to the latest contemporary art in collections of paintings and sculpture. “This museum will not look like any other, because it will not be a museum of sub-Saharan Africa,” said Hamady Bocoum, the director of the museum, adding that the pan-African project “will be proof that the African man is well in history.” Since the museum could contain works owned by France since colonization, Senegal’s culture minister has called for the restitution by France of all Senegalese artwork on the back of a French report urging the return of African art treasures. According to Abdou Latif Coulibaly, the country was ready to work with France to find an amicable solution, adding that “If you have 10,000 pieces (of art identified from Senegal), we want to have the 10,000.” Apart from suffering from the negative consequences of colonialism, Africans have had to negotiate for the return of valuable historical cultural artefacts that were smuggled out of their countries. These priceless monuments, which symbolize African identity are currently scattered across the world, with an impressive number in British and French Museums. Many African countries have called for the return of these treasures but are yet to receive any positive response from these western countries, which are making huge sums of money from these objects, with some even insisting that they were obtained legally. French President Emmanuel Macron recently announced that his country will return 26 artefacts taken from Benin in 1892. The thrones and statues, currently on display at the Quai Branly museum in Paris, were taken during a colonial war against the then Kingdom of Dahomey. The statement comes a few months after Macron announced that a commision had been set up to look into the issue of returning looted artefacts to their rightful African countries during a joint press appearance with the President of Benin, Patrice Talon. The announcement by France that the artefacts should be returned “without delay” has sparked discussions about the return of all African artefacts in European museums, especially with information that the U.K. had decided in October to return Nigerian artefacts on a temporary basis. Senegal has built the largest museum of black civilizations — afrikhepri.org Meanwhile, the Museum of Black Civilisations is said to be one of the elements of the Cultural Park which Wade refers to as one of the “Seven Wonders.” The six other buildings are the Grand National Theater, the School of Beautiful Arts, the School of Architecture and the Music Palace, the Contemporary Art Museum, the National Library combined with the National Archives. By Mildred Europa Taylor is a writer and content creator. She loves writing about health and women's issues in Africa and the African diaspora.

Day of Outrage ooo!- Stop the Murder of BLACK Women by Police ooo!

https://twitter.com/MeritLaw/status/1188766666202726400?s=09

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Police Killing Blackamerikkkan Women ooo!

https://twitter.com/TamikaDMallory/status/1188640469242306563?s=09

On Monday, October 28th, @UntilFreedom & partners will honor the life of #AtatianaJefferson & the countless black women who have been killed at the hands of police.

Black women are worthy of our outrage and are worthy of a country that values their lives.

#DayOfOutrage

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

MALCOLM X ooo!-BLACK PEOPLE OOO!--MALCOLM X INTERVIEW IN LONDON

#NonBeliever✊🏾😡 (@Fresh_Flames1) tweeted at 0:28 AM on Mon, Feb 13, 2017:
Today In #BlackHistoryMonth #MalcolmX Was Interviewed By The Johannesburg Sunday Express February 12 1965 In London About African Liberation

https://twitter.com/Fresh_Flames1/status/830921654557605889?s=03

Jesus was BLACK ooo!

https://www.washingtonian.com/2019/10/11/a-massive-sculpture-of-an-african-american-last-supper-hidden-for-years-has-been-discovered-in-columbia-heights/

Olojo Festival in Ile Ife----YORUBA ooo!-


Olojo
An Epic Festivity that attracts one million attendees
12th October 2019

Musa Jibril

On September 29, the climax of Olojo festival, the ancient city of Ile-Ife––famed as the cradle of creation according to Yoruba mythology–– was a boiling cauldron of festivity. The city was bursting at the seams with the influx of population. The epic showpiece of culture and tradition was billed to attract a large number of visitors from around the world and it did attract a multitude far beyond the projected figure. Tourists and traditionalists of Afro religions had journeyed from the remotest corners of the globe and from big cosmopolitan capital cities to witness the final day of the cultural fest, which started on Sept 21.

On the final day, the Ooni of Ife had appeared from his seven-day seclusion and fasting where he had been praying for the Yoruba race, the country and the world at large, his appearance sparking jubilations that lasted through the day, as he received visitors in the city and later led a procession wearing the legendary Ade Aare crown. The rest of the day unravelled in a dramatic fashion.

Back in 2010, I had visited Ile-Ife and spent three days in the city. I remember the city for its Eko at’ Akara and palm wine, and also the fact that a city could be so wrapped up in lethargy. A city with Old World charms––that is part of its allure, especially when you get introduced to its trove of mythical stories.

The most popular of the Ife stories is of its creation, which stretched back to an immemorial epoch.

The first city, “Ife Oodaye, Ile owuro, ibiti oju ti mo”––Ife, the land of most ancient days where the dawn of the day was first experienced––was ended by a flood, and in its place rose Ife Ooyelagbo, city of survivors.

The third and present-day Ife was founded by a supernatural process, which began with the arrival of Oduduwa and the extra-terrestrial beings, Orisas.

Fast forward to 2019. Ife is a New World, characterized by 21st-century verve and vigour brewing from the crucible of cultural tourism.

And you have the Olojo festival commemorating the descent of Oduduwa to Ile-Ife and celebrating the first dawn in creation. That makes the festival, one of the oldest in Ile-Ife.

Olojo festival is a testament to the city’s timeless traditions, not least because it is a cultural citadel ruled by one of the oldest royalties in Africa.

On this day in September, the king led a procession of traditional chiefs and priests to the shrine at Oke Mogun––where the first dawn came into existence––surrounded by a sea of spectators including white people from all walks of life,  some of them journalists, scholars and afro-religious devotees.

The king’s abode, Ile Oodua (House of Oduduwa), located at Enuwa, the centre of the town, was a burst of gaiety and grandeur, a centre of a lavish display of traditions, high fashion, music and dancing. Several bodies of traditional religion adherents registered their presence to pay obeisance to the spiritual father of the Yoruba race. Fuji maestro, Wasiu Ayinde, K1, had performed at the finale.

At this year’s celebration, the Ooni was portrayed in a new light. The sight of the king garbed in white robe and coral beads, with his queen sitting next to him added a sparkle to the cultural event. It was an event that lived up to expectations.

The growing importance of the festival is reflected by the size of visitors. The 2016 record showed 250,000 attendees. It was projected that the festival would attract over a million visitors to the spiritual homeland of the Yoruba by 2021. The 2019 edition appeared to have crossed the mark.

Olojo
An Epic Festivity that attracts one million attendees
12th October 2019

Musa Jibril

On September 29, the climax of Olojo festival, the ancient city of Ile-Ife––famed as the cradle of creation according to Yoruba mythology–– was a boiling cauldron of festivity. The city was bursting at the seams with the influx of population. The epic showpiece of culture and tradition was billed to attract a large number of visitors from around the world and it did attract a multitude far beyond the projected figure. Tourists and traditionalists of Afro religions had journeyed from the remotest corners of the globe and from big cosmopolitan capital cities to witness the final day of the cultural fest, which started on Sept 21.

On the final day, the Ooni of Ife had appeared from his seven-day seclusion and fasting where he had been praying for the Yoruba race, the country and the world at large, his appearance sparking jubilations that lasted through the day, as he received visitors in the city and later led a procession wearing the legendary Ade Aare crown. The rest of the day unravelled in a dramatic fashion.

Back in 2010, I had visited Ile-Ife and spent three days in the city. I remember the city for its Eko at’ Akara and palm wine, and also the fact that a city could be so wrapped up in lethargy. A city with Old World charms––that is part of its allure, especially when you get introduced to its trove of mythical stories.

The most popular of the Ife stories is of its creation, which stretched back to an immemorial epoch.

The first city, “Ife Oodaye, Ile owuro, ibiti oju ti mo”––Ife, the land of most ancient days where the dawn of the day was first experienced––was ended by a flood, and in its place rose Ife Ooyelagbo, city of survivors.

The third and present-day Ife was founded by a supernatural process, which began with the arrival of Oduduwa and the extra-terrestrial beings, Orisas.

Fast forward to 2019. Ife is a New World, characterized by 21st-century verve and vigour brewing from the crucible of cultural tourism.

And you have the Olojo festival commemorating the descent of Oduduwa to Ile-Ife and celebrating the first dawn in creation. That makes the festival, one of the oldest in Ile-Ife.

Olojo festival is a testament to the city’s timeless traditions, not least because it is a cultural citadel ruled by one of the oldest royalties in Africa.

On this day in September, the king led a procession of traditional chiefs and priests to the shrine at Oke Mogun––where the first dawn came into existence––surrounded by a sea of spectators including white people from all walks of life,  some of them journalists, scholars and afro-religious devotees.

The king’s abode, Ile Oodua (House of Oduduwa), located at Enuwa, the centre of the town, was a burst of gaiety and grandeur, a centre of a lavish display of traditions, high fashion, music and dancing. Several bodies of traditional religion adherents registered their presence to pay obeisance to the spiritual father of the Yoruba race. Fuji maestro, Wasiu Ayinde, K1, had performed at the finale.

At this year’s celebration, the Ooni was portrayed in a new light. The sight of the king garbed in white robe and coral beads, with his queen sitting next to him added a sparkle to the cultural event. It was an event that lived up to expectations.

The growing importance of the festival is reflected by the size of visitors. The 2016 record showed 250,000 attendees. It was projected that the festival would attract over a million visitors to the spiritual homeland of the Yoruba by 2021. The 2019 edition appeared to have crossed the mark.

Jesus was BLACK ooo!

https://www.washingtonian.com/2019/10/11/a-massive-sculpture-of-an-african-american-last-supper-hidden-for-years-has-been-discovered-in-columbia-heights/

Olojo Festival in Ile Ife----YORUBA ooo!-


Olojo
An Epic Festivity that attracts one million attendees
12th October 2019

Musa Jibril

On September 29, the climax of Olojo festival, the ancient city of Ile-Ife––famed as the cradle of creation according to Yoruba mythology–– was a boiling cauldron of festivity. The city was bursting at the seams with the influx of population. The epic showpiece of culture and tradition was billed to attract a large number of visitors from around the world and it did attract a multitude far beyond the projected figure. Tourists and traditionalists of Afro religions had journeyed from the remotest corners of the globe and from big cosmopolitan capital cities to witness the final day of the cultural fest, which started on Sept 21.

On the final day, the Ooni of Ife had appeared from his seven-day seclusion and fasting where he had been praying for the Yoruba race, the country and the world at large, his appearance sparking jubilations that lasted through the day, as he received visitors in the city and later led a procession wearing the legendary Ade Aare crown. The rest of the day unravelled in a dramatic fashion.

Back in 2010, I had visited Ile-Ife and spent three days in the city. I remember the city for its Eko at’ Akara and palm wine, and also the fact that a city could be so wrapped up in lethargy. A city with Old World charms––that is part of its allure, especially when you get introduced to its trove of mythical stories.

The most popular of the Ife stories is of its creation, which stretched back to an immemorial epoch.

The first city, “Ife Oodaye, Ile owuro, ibiti oju ti mo”––Ife, the land of most ancient days where the dawn of the day was first experienced––was ended by a flood, and in its place rose Ife Ooyelagbo, city of survivors.

The third and present-day Ife was founded by a supernatural process, which began with the arrival of Oduduwa and the extra-terrestrial beings, Orisas.

Fast forward to 2019. Ife is a New World, characterized by 21st-century verve and vigour brewing from the crucible of cultural tourism.

And you have the Olojo festival commemorating the descent of Oduduwa to Ile-Ife and celebrating the first dawn in creation. That makes the festival, one of the oldest in Ile-Ife.

Olojo festival is a testament to the city’s timeless traditions, not least because it is a cultural citadel ruled by one of the oldest royalties in Africa.

On this day in September, the king led a procession of traditional chiefs and priests to the shrine at Oke Mogun––where the first dawn came into existence––surrounded by a sea of spectators including white people from all walks of life,  some of them journalists, scholars and afro-religious devotees.

The king’s abode, Ile Oodua (House of Oduduwa), located at Enuwa, the centre of the town, was a burst of gaiety and grandeur, a centre of a lavish display of traditions, high fashion, music and dancing. Several bodies of traditional religion adherents registered their presence to pay obeisance to the spiritual father of the Yoruba race. Fuji maestro, Wasiu Ayinde, K1, had performed at the finale.

At this year’s celebration, the Ooni was portrayed in a new light. The sight of the king garbed in white robe and coral beads, with his queen sitting next to him added a sparkle to the cultural event. It was an event that lived up to expectations.

The growing importance of the festival is reflected by the size of visitors. The 2016 record showed 250,000 attendees. It was projected that the festival would attract over a million visitors to the spiritual homeland of the Yoruba by 2021. The 2019 edition appeared to have crossed the mark.

Olojo
An Epic Festivity that attracts one million attendees
12th October 2019

Musa Jibril

On September 29, the climax of Olojo festival, the ancient city of Ile-Ife––famed as the cradle of creation according to Yoruba mythology–– was a boiling cauldron of festivity. The city was bursting at the seams with the influx of population. The epic showpiece of culture and tradition was billed to attract a large number of visitors from around the world and it did attract a multitude far beyond the projected figure. Tourists and traditionalists of Afro religions had journeyed from the remotest corners of the globe and from big cosmopolitan capital cities to witness the final day of the cultural fest, which started on Sept 21.

On the final day, the Ooni of Ife had appeared from his seven-day seclusion and fasting where he had been praying for the Yoruba race, the country and the world at large, his appearance sparking jubilations that lasted through the day, as he received visitors in the city and later led a procession wearing the legendary Ade Aare crown. The rest of the day unravelled in a dramatic fashion.

Back in 2010, I had visited Ile-Ife and spent three days in the city. I remember the city for its Eko at’ Akara and palm wine, and also the fact that a city could be so wrapped up in lethargy. A city with Old World charms––that is part of its allure, especially when you get introduced to its trove of mythical stories.

The most popular of the Ife stories is of its creation, which stretched back to an immemorial epoch.

The first city, “Ife Oodaye, Ile owuro, ibiti oju ti mo”––Ife, the land of most ancient days where the dawn of the day was first experienced––was ended by a flood, and in its place rose Ife Ooyelagbo, city of survivors.

The third and present-day Ife was founded by a supernatural process, which began with the arrival of Oduduwa and the extra-terrestrial beings, Orisas.

Fast forward to 2019. Ife is a New World, characterized by 21st-century verve and vigour brewing from the crucible of cultural tourism.

And you have the Olojo festival commemorating the descent of Oduduwa to Ile-Ife and celebrating the first dawn in creation. That makes the festival, one of the oldest in Ile-Ife.

Olojo festival is a testament to the city’s timeless traditions, not least because it is a cultural citadel ruled by one of the oldest royalties in Africa.

On this day in September, the king led a procession of traditional chiefs and priests to the shrine at Oke Mogun––where the first dawn came into existence––surrounded by a sea of spectators including white people from all walks of life,  some of them journalists, scholars and afro-religious devotees.

The king’s abode, Ile Oodua (House of Oduduwa), located at Enuwa, the centre of the town, was a burst of gaiety and grandeur, a centre of a lavish display of traditions, high fashion, music and dancing. Several bodies of traditional religion adherents registered their presence to pay obeisance to the spiritual father of the Yoruba race. Fuji maestro, Wasiu Ayinde, K1, had performed at the finale.

At this year’s celebration, the Ooni was portrayed in a new light. The sight of the king garbed in white robe and coral beads, with his queen sitting next to him added a sparkle to the cultural event. It was an event that lived up to expectations.

The growing importance of the festival is reflected by the size of visitors. The 2016 record showed 250,000 attendees. It was projected that the festival would attract over a million visitors to the spiritual homeland of the Yoruba by 2021. The 2019 edition appeared to have crossed the mark.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

YORUBA Proverb oooo!-"Be Focused"

https://twitter.com/yoruba_proverbs/status/1176013325475307520?s=09

Gbogbo ọ̀rọ̀ ló lésì, ṣùgbọ́n kì í ṣe gbogbo ọ̀rọ̀ làá fèsì sí. /
There is always an appropriate response to every statement, but it's not every statement that one responds to.
[Be focused; not all pursuits deserve our energy: don't major on minors.] #Yoruba #proverb

Xenophobia in South Africa oooo!-From The Nation Newspaper, Nigeria

https://thenationonlineng.net/crime-as-rationale-for-xenophobia-and-hysteria-against-nigerians-south-africa-and-beyond/amp/#aoh=15692280500863&referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&_tf=From%20%251%24s

Crime as rationale for xenophobia and hysteria against Nigerians – South Africa and beyond
by Biodun Jeyifo

Most Nigerians have never seen and will probably never see the 2009 South African-made film. “District 9”. A sci-fi fantasy thriller that was immensely successful at home and abroad, the film depicts a South Africa invaded by two alien groups, one comprised of Nigerians and the other of giant prawn-like extraterrestrial beings from outer space. The ugly, misshapen and menacing aliens from outer space have their abode in a huge spacecraft hovering over Johannesburg. The other alien group, the “Nigerians” are quartered in a crime-ridden, drug-infested area of the city over which they exercise uncontested but severely confined control. Their leader is a hoodlum whose name is – Obasanjo! Remember this, dear reader: in the period when the film was written, shot, and edited before being released in 2009, Olusegun Obasanjo was the president of Nigeria. And given the fact that “District 9” adopted a pseudo-documentary narrative style, its allusion to Nigeria as an object of its devastating negative critique is unmistakable.

It was bracing for me to watch “District 9” when it was released to wide critical acclaim and huge commercial success. For this reason, I have never watched the film a second time. Its critical and commercial success is based on the fact that whatever I or any Nigerian may say about it, it is a very entertaining film. The naïve, anti-heroic “hero” of the film is an ordinary, likable guy who tries to understand and bond with the menacing aliens from outer space. As a matter of fact, in the course of the film he gradually metamorphoses into one of them after he is accidentally bitten by one of the aliens. And it turns out that the extraterrestrial aliens come from a civilization that is far in advance of our own earthly civilization. At any rate, the prawn-like aliens manage to repair their damaged spaceship and at the end of the film depart from Joburg, from our planet, leaving us to our phobias, our inanities, our fears and hatred of the “other”. Everyone is relieved to see them leave.

But not “Obasanjo” and the “Nigerians”! They want the aliens handed over to them to be killed and consumed in the atavistic belief that the aliens’ power will be ritualistically transferred to them. This is beside the fact that the aliens are, after all, giant prawns – what do you do with prawns? This is the ultimate coup de grace in the film’s racist and xenophobic assault on Nigerians and black people: as the whole world marvels at the advanced civilization of the aliens, all the “Nigerians” care about is a cannibalistic ritual transfer of the aliens’ knowledge and power to them. This brings to my mind a forgotten or little-known fact about Olusegun Obasanjo. What is this fact?

Well, at the height of the armed struggle phase of the continent-wide anti-apartheid movement, Obasanjo, the real Obasanjo, our own Obasanjo, once infamously boasted that with a single battalion-strength force of the Nigerian army, he could invade South Africa and conquer the whole of the army, air force and navy of the apartheid regime because he had the charms and the supernatural fortifications to effect such a victory. It is tempting to see the director and writer of the screenplay of “District 9”, Neill Blomkamp, going back to this story of our Obasanjo for inspiration in the depiction of the “Obasanjo” of his film who wants to cannibalize the aliens in order to absorb their power into his person. Of course, far beyond the real and/or fictional Obasanjo, “District 9” gestures toward and recycles enduring apartheid myths of black African primitivism and savagery. The film’s “success” in this regard was to have successfully displaced to “Nigerians” the inferior and savage “otherness” which had been directed at black South Africans for centuries but which could no longer be continued openly in the post-apartheid era. In other words, “District 9” found in the xenophobia and hysteria against Nigerians in South Africa the means through which it could make black and white South Africans “comfortable” with an open, even blatant display of residual aspects of apartheid-era anti-black racism. Crime or, more generally, criminality, is the foundation of the enabling xenophobia and hysteria. And indeed, “District 9” is stunning in its assumption that all South Africans, black and white, could be counted upon to accept that “Obasanjo” and the criminal gang of “Nigerians” in the film constitute an accurate reflection of widely held perceptions of Nigeria and Nigerians in South Africa.

We must brace ourselves, compatriots, to confront this terribly confounding idea that the crimes and criminality of some Nigerians in many countries and regions of the world come from and are lodged in Nigeria itself. Let us not make light of this fact: in the recent xenophobic hysteria in South Africa against virtually all the nationals of other African countries, Nigeria was singled out and the basis for this was the alleged dominance of the criminality of Nigerians over that of all the other national groups combined. The assumption behind this belief or perception is that the alleged Nigerian exceptionalism in criminality could have come from nowhere but Nigeria itself.

We must of course completely refute and reject this idea. This is because no matter how seemingly ‘true” the idea may be, it amounts to nothing more than the literal observation that since Nigerians come from Nigeria – and can only come from Nigeria – the crimes and criminality they might manifest in other parts of the world come from Nigeria. But this is ridiculous and it is tautological. Does the altruism, the brilliance in the arts, sciences or technology that many Nigerians show in many parts of the world also come from and are lodged in Nigeria itself? What is peculiar about crime in general and the criminality of Nigerians abroad that so many people, including Nigerians themselves, trace its origin, its essentiality to Nigeria itself? That is the nature of the problem that we face in this issue, compatriots. When Nigerian criminals abroad are deported back to Nigeria – as has happened on countess occasions – that is the imputed belief: go back to where you brought your criminal propensities and acts!

No single event is more indicative of this issue than that of the notorious CNN “60 Minutes” broadcast about two decades ago on corruption by Nigerians and in Nigeria. Led by the late Mike Wallace, the “60 Minutes” crew came to Nigeria and with hidden cameras and microphones recorded high public officials demanding and receiving bribes from members of the crew. In the most astonishing episode of all, the broadcast showed Mike Wallace, a white Jewish American, paying for and receiving a Nigerian passport which stated that his state of origin was Ekiti State! One secretly recorded episode took place at the Head Office of the Central Bank, then still in Lagos; it showed Wallace bargaining with an official of the bank on how much a transaction involving forex would cost the American and his putative Nigerian principals. The official involved was apparently so secure in his nefarious practices and so complacent in his belief that he could and would never be caught that he divulged to Wallace all the means by which the American could obtain clearance or certification for any deal he wanted to make in the country, no matter how illegal and improbable it was. Indeed, it was from this experience of the secret filming of Nigerian criminality at home, official and non-official, that Wallace later made his infamous declaration that Nigeria was the most corrupt country in the world. Unfortunately for him, Wallace made the declaration while doing an interview with Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam who was so outraged by that declaration that he countered that not Nigeria but America was the most corrupt nation on the planet. Kudos to Minister Farrakhan, but alas, many Nigerians too think, like the late Mike Wallace, that their country is the most corrupt country in the world. And if that is the case, can you blame South Africans for thinking the same thing?

My response to this question is unequivocal: yes, you must blame South Africans, you must blame Americans, you must blame Filipinos, and you must blame Nigerians themselves who think that Nigeria is the most corrupt country in the world. There is simply no such country in the world where corruption and/or criminality is at its unquestionable highest. Yes, Nigeria is one of the most corrupt countries in the world. But so is South Africa and the USA and Brazil and Afghanistan and many countries in Africa and Latin America! Right now, at this very moment in time, which country in the world is close to the level of corruption of great impunity that it tolerates in its leader and head of state as Donald Trump’s America? And beside Trump himself, what of the uncountable cases of corporate greed and corruption in the US? This is well-known and no one has ever used it to stir up hysteria and xenophobia against Americans as Americans the way Nigerians, simply for being Nigerians, have been targeted with hysteria and xenophobia in South Africa and other places in the world.

This last observation brings me to my closing reflections in this piece which pertains to benign and even humorous forms of hysteria and xenophobia against Nigerians and their presumed national penchant for corruption and venality. The aforementioned “District 9” is a vintage example of this kind of “benign” hysteria against Nigeria. This is because while no physical violence and no forceful expulsion are urged against “Obasanjo” and the “Nigerian” criminals in the film, they are nonetheless consistently depicted as objects of absurdity and derision. The same principle or logic applies to the profiles of Nigerian criminality in American television, radio, newspapers and social media: the depiction is so full of real or feigned surprise at the temerity of Nigerian fraudsters and scammers that you begin to think that there is a secret admiration for the criminals! On many occasions, I have heard jokes on Nigerian “419” and other online or Internet scams by standup comics and even the iconic “Saturday Night Live” of the NBC. Indeed, so widespread is this phenomenon that one colleague at Harvard once asked me why, since Nigerians were apparently so “clever” they did not apply that “cleverness” to other things? My response to him? I said: “you mean you have not noticed that at Harvard and other Ivy-league universities and their public counterparts second-generation Nigerian Americans are second only to Asian Americans in performance and achievement?”

In the early 1970s when I was a graduate student at New York University, there were many other Nigerian students at NYU itself and other universities in New York and around the country. We were very noticeable too then as a high-performing national group among other nationals from the African continent and other parts of the developing world. “419” and other infamous frauds and scams were nowhere yet in sight. Thus, our achievements did not have to be measured and balanced against the dubious “cleverness” of fraudsters. Criminality is not an essential or permanent aspect of Nigerianness. This era of the PDP-APC kleptocratic predatoriness shall pass. Ergo: Nigeria will not always be one of the most corrupt places in the world. For those who would use the facts and the perceptions of Nigerian criminality at home and abroad – be they Nigerians and/or Non-Nigerians – as the measure of the country’s essence, we must say a resounding “No’! In other words, take away the excuse, the rationale of criminality and xenophobic hysteria will have no legs on which to stand – in South Africa and other parts of the world. If you ever get to watch “District 9”, keep these admonitions in mind, compatriot.

Biodun Jeyifo
bjeyifo@fas.harvard

YORUBA Proverb-"We Owe All to God"

Àgbẹ̀ tí kòkó ẹ̀ yè, kì í ṣe mímọ̀ọ́ ṣe ẹ̀, bíkòṣe Elédùà. /
A farmer with a thriving cocoa farm owes this not just to his effort, but to God.
[We owe all to God; be modest and be thankful to Him.] #Yoruba #proverb

https://twitter.com/yoruba_proverbs/status/1180724366604193793?s=09

NIGERIAN GOVERNOR Puts HIS CHILD IN A PUBLIC SCHOOL ooo!

https://twitter.com/legitngnews/status/1176083944871215112?s=09

Blackamerikkkan Becomes Queen in Ghana oooo!

Face2Face Africa


Lisa Raye is now a queen mother in the Central Region of Ghana
American actress, model and entrepreneur, Lisa Raye McRoy, is now a queen mother in the Central Region in Ghana.

According to The Source, Lisa Raye was enstooled at the Cicada Restaurant and Club in Los Angeles, U.S., just a day before her birthday, which fell on September 23.

Raye was handpicked by the Paramount Chief of Agona Kwanyako and the entire Kyidom Traditional Divisional Council.

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Black ‘kings’ and ‘queens’ at the Lion King premiere in Hollywood [Photos]
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Her contributions and humanitarian efforts over the years in Ghana earned the Chicago-native the royal prestige, which she has described as an honour “beyond my wildest imagination.”

As a queen mother, Raye has been given lands to build schools for girls so that she can train and uplift them in career-changing skills, reports lisptickalley.com

Commenting on her enstoolment, Raye said: “I plan to do all that I can by using my platform to bring positive attention to this region. I will serve humbly. I’ve had lots of accomplishments in my life, personally and professionally, but I didn’t get to this point alone. It’s taken a great team of people along the way. To have such an honor bestowed upon me by my own African people is a testament to my hard work and character. It’s like a dream coming true before my very eyes.”

Since the 17th century, enstoolments, or installation of chiefs and queens, have become common. Started by the Ashanti people of Ghana, queen mothers play an important role in local governance and “wield social power and influence.”

All Photos from Instagram (@therealraye1 @twobeesent)


Queen Lisa Raye with King Larweh



Queen Lisa Raye about to cut her birthday cake




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It’s all good. Crowning of Queen Mother of Ghana w/my family last nite. Simply Beautiful #LifeRocks #BirthdayWeekend

A post shared by LisaRaye McCoy (@thereallraye1) on Sep 23, 2019 at 3:33pm PDT

View this post on Instagram
Oh you a Queen Queen 👸🏽 #LisaRayeMccoy was crowned Queen Mother of Ghana. The enstoolment ceremony was held yesterday, the day before her birthday, at the Cicada Restaurant & Club in downtown Los Angeles. Enstoolment, or installation, is one of the last great African tribal traditions. It was started in the 17th Century by the Ashanti people of Ghana. McCoy will reign over Ghana’s Central Region. The Chicago native earned her new regal title for her humanitarian efforts over the years and was handpicked by the Paramount Chief of Agona Kwanyako, the chiefs and the entire Kyidom Traditional Divisional Councils. “This honor is beyond my wildest imagination,”she said. “I plan to do all that I can by using my platform to bring positive attention to this region. I will serve humbly.” The actress continued, “I’ve had lots of accomplishments in my life, personally and professionally, but I didn’t get to this point alone. It’s taken a great team of people along the way. To have such an honor bestowed upon me by my own African people is a testament to my hard work and character. It’s like a dream coming true before my very eyes.”

Healing of Bad Husband in Christian Science

https://m.csmonitor.com/Commentary/A-Christian-Science-Perspective/2016/0907/A-wife-s-healing

Nigeria ooo!-Nigerian Girl With Electronic Brain o!

Meet 15-year old Oluwatunmise Idowu has been described as a scholar with an "electric brain".

In 2016, she solved 17 mathematical problems correctly in 60 seconds(a record on cowbellpedia TV-quiz show) and the record remain unbroken till date https://t.co/qzvk2naiQ9

https://twitter.com/NGRFacts/status/1179628877649518592?s=09


https://twitter.com/NGRFacts/status/1179628877649518592?s=09

YORUBA Lecture On Promotion of Our Heritage

September 20, 2019 •

Lecture: Developing Our Cultural Heritage For Sustainable Domestic & Foreign Tourism Patronage, By Dare Babarinsa

Mikail Mumuni

DEVELOPING OUR CULTURAL HERITAGE FOR SUSTAINABLE DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN TOURISM PATRONAGE
By Dare Babarinsa Chairman, Gaskia Media Limited
I am happy to be back home in Ile-Ife today. For me, Ife is not just the home of the Yoruba, it is especially my home. In 1969, I was admitted into the Ife Anglican Grammar School, Ondo Road, Ile-Ife, where I spent four and half years until I wrote my School Certificate Examination in June 1973.
Therefore, Ile-Ife is my roots. I was one of the young students who lined the streets of Iremo when President Leopold Senghor, the poet-President of Senegal, visited Ife when he was honoured with a doctorate degree by the University of Ife (now Obafemi Awolowo University) in 1971. Senghor was accompanied on that trip by his host, General Yakubu Gowon. I later joined thousands of people who trooped to this palace when the august visitor was received by our father, Oba Adesoji TadeniawoAderemi, then the Ooni.
In his speech at the University on that day, President Senghor referred to Ile-Ife as the “land of the First Dawn.”Indeed, our ancestors believe that the world began in Ile-Ife where humanity first took form. At the dawn of all beginnings, Oduduwa came from heaven, accompanied by the 401 deities of the Yoruba pantheon, armed with the soil of heaven and a celestial cock. He poured the soil on the unsettled elements of early creation and with the help of the cock who spread the soil, the continents took form. Since then, Ile-Ife is Ile, home while other towns are ode, abroad, like you have Ode Ondo, Ijebu-Ode, Ode Irele and Ode Oyo.
The prospect presented by our cultural heritage as a tourism product shows that not less than 50% of global tourist travel, Nigeria inclusive, is in search of new experience, leisure, knowledge, understanding and entertainment to historical, archaeological, museums or heritage sites in places outside the usual places of residence.
The portfolio of our cultural heritage in terms of sites and festival is not in short supply in Nigeria from the Eyo festivals in Lagos to the grandeur of the Ooni Palace, Calabash carving and Alaafin Palace in Oyo, EkpoMasqurade in Akwa Ibom, Igue Festival in Edo, Mmanwu festival in Enugu, Durba in Kaduna, kano City walls, Agungun Fish Festival Sokoto, Tiv anger Weavers in Plateau and Ushafa Pottery Center in Abuja, our own Ojude Oba and Osun Osogbo Festivals and our various museums, just to mention a few across the Country.
All of this deepens tourism and delivers a process of giving our rich and deep routed culture abounding untapped commercial value. This is not in the least leaving out our cultural affinity, food, cultural safaris and our palaces. Yoruba are principally in the South Western part of Nigeria below the River Niger to the North and the same river to the East. In the South, the land is boarded by the Atlantic Ocean. Perhaps there are as many Yoruba living outside Yorubaland as those who are living in Nigeria. Millions of our people call Northern Nigeria their home.
Nigeria is a country endowed with a lot of cultural heritages sourced from its multicultural communities. Globally the importance of heritages to countries and even in developing nations like Nigeria cannot be over-emphasized. This is due to its economic, historical, tourist, aesthetic, educational and research significances. Heritages are cherished characteristic features of a society passed down from generation to generation through conscious preservation.
Heritages refer to the riches of extinct and extant societies which are of historic, educational, recreational, and economic importance, preserved and handed over from one generation to another. Put differently, heritages are significant endowments emanating from man and nature.
Following from the above, heritages could be categorized into two, based on their sources namely: ecological/natural heritages and cultural heritages. Ecological or natural heritages emanate from nature and environment. Ecological heritages can be defined as the relatively undisturbed or uncontaminated natural areas with its wild plants (flora) and animals (fauna) and its geomorphic features (caves, rivers, lakes, hills, mountains, cataracts) conserved for the specific objectives of studying, admiring, and enjoying the scenery which it affords. In Ile- Ife, we have many of such and kudos must be given to Kabiyesi AROLE ODUDUWA ‘OLOFIN ADINMULA, OONI ADEYEYE ENITAN OGUNWUSI, OJAJA II, OONI OF IFE for works done to renovate many of these in his domain. We have OpaOranmiyan, Moremi Statute, Ile Aje etc.
Nigeria is endowed with ‘about 29 game reserves, 1129 forest reserves, 4 game sanctuaries, 2 strict nature reserves and 8 national parks. It is pertinent to state that ecological heritage is outside the scope of this paper, therefore we are going to concentrate on the second type of heritage mentioned above which is cultural heritage.
Cultural heritage is the legacy of physical artifacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations. Cultural heritages evolve from man’s ingenious activities, preserved and transmitted through oral traditions or in written concrete forms across generations of human societies. Oral tradition is the body of information concerning history, culture and environment of a people at any given time and space.
This information is often obtained through the words of mouth. It is also a set of verbally transmitted pieces of information about the experiences and worldviews of a people. These experiences and worldviews are preserved in the memories of the group of people and are transmitted from one generation to another. Oral tradition remains an indispensable cultural heritage management strategy among pre-modern and pre-historic Africans which continues to be relevant in contemporary Nigeria.
Most oral traditions obtained through ethnographic studies have been confirmed by archaeological and historical findings. The clan & village heads, kings, chiefs, deity priests, aged/older men and women serve as repositories and custodians of their oral traditions. They include traditional adages, lullabies, poems, riddles, incantations, praise songs such as oriki, recitals of traditional religions like the Ifa verses among the Yoruba of western Nigeria and other facets of their individual community’s cultural heritages. Oral tradition has proved to be a useful instrument to professionals like the archaeologists and ethnographers in locating and identifying cultural heritage sites/areas for further studies and preservation. Cultural heritage is, however limited to man-made artifacts and ideologies.
Cultural heritages can be defined as the sum total of the people’s cherished arts, customs, festivals, sacred or worship sites, norms, values, ideologies, dress and dress-patterns, traditional monuments & architectures, technology and technological sites and other artifacts which are cherished and conserved for their historical, political, educational, recreational and religious significance among others. Cultural heritages are therefore the sum total of material and non-material cultures of a particular society transmitted across generations.
Developing Nigeria’s cultural heritages is capable of promoting collective consciousness in terms of unity, oneness, nationalism and fostering peaceful co-existence among Nigerians. For instance, cultural heritages can be categorized into two namely material/tangible and non-material/intangible cultural heritages. This is because culture in itself is “both physical and non-physical in character”.
Tangible cultural heritages include man’s physical ingenious products which can be touched and seen such as architecture/buildings, defensive walls and ditches, crafts, tools, ivory, cowries, paintings, textiles, pestles, mortars, iron furnaces, knives, food, wooden objects, tombs & grave goods, temples, dresses, pottery & potsherd pavements, monuments, books, works of art, and among other artifacts. It is therefore important to state that man cannot survive without the construction and use of artifacts”.
This further gives a deeper explanation to the function of cultural heritages to society. On the other hand, non-material or ideological cultural heritages include all intangible and invisible aspects of a peoples’ ways of life such as ideas, folklore, kinship, norms, values, worldviews, philosophies of life, religious beliefs and practices, music, dance, festivals, traditions, language, and knowledge among others.
The cultural activities, arts and festivals were managed by the traditional rulers and chiefs in council through delegation of powers to talented specialist. For instance, the carvers made masks for masquerades, the traditional costume designers made royal regalia, beads and dresses, other crafts makers made baskets, local talking drums and other musical instruments; the music and dance specialists made music, praise songs to celebrate valiant warriors and trained dancers for annual festivals.
These skills were preserved through oral tradition and training of this crafts men and women; and then the skills were handed over from generation to generations. This generational pattern of preserving Nigerian cultural heritages was completely or partially truncated in most parts of Nigeria due to unsolicited incursion of colonialism.
Considering the avalanche of benefits that could be derived from Nigerian cultural heritages, there is need for a clarion call to consciously develop, sustain for domestic and foreign tourism patronage. Language is major while we have continued, regrettably though, the moonlight stories has given way to cartoons and the televisions. Nigerian cultural heritages are faced with a lot of challenges such as the influence of modernization, Christianity, commerce, civilization, change, development, looting, and antiquarians, among others. Apart from smuggling, theft, vandalism and looting of museums, another most threatening challenge facing Nigerian cultural heritage is religious dogmatism and iconoclasm as a result of die-hard suffering from colonial hangover which make the religious zealots burn cultural objects in the name of deliverance.
Notwithstanding, Nigerians have been able to preserve their cultural heritages till date and hopes they would be sustained for patronage, locally and internationally. We have practically westernized our sensibilities at the expense of our cultural heritage.
Million of Yoruba are living in other parts of Nigeria outside Yorubaland and they still speak their language, wear clothes that are peculiar to them, eat foods that Yoruba’s are known for. I would like us to focus more on Yoruba’s who live outside Nigeria. They are grouped into three categories.
YORUBA IN YORUBALAND OUTSIDE NIGERIA
In January 1988, I joined a group of journalists on a trip to the Republic of Togo as a guest of the late President Gnassingbe Eyadema. As part of our trip, we were taken to a coastal town where the traditional ruler said his ancestors came from Ile-Ife. He was bedecked like a full Yoruba Oba. In 2010 also, I met with Oba OnikoyiAbesan in his palace at Ajase (Porto-Novo). In front of the palace was a full statue of Oduduwa. He said he had visited his father, the Ooni of Ife, several times. He spoke Yoruba fluently without the reckless affectations of Nigerian-Yoruba elites who love to mix Yoruba language with English. Yoruba people who are in Benin Republic and Togo are actually living in Yorubaland. It was the partition of Africa in the 19th Century that took that part of Yorubaland to other countries.
When we visited President Eyadema, the Commander of the Togolese Air force could easily be recognized as a Yoruba because of his prominent Oyo facial marks. In Benin Republic, the biggest Yoruba town is Ketu. We know that Oba Alaketu is one of the most prominent princes of Oduduwa. In Porto-Novo, Radio Weke broadcast only in Yoruba. You have many prominent landmarks, including Hotel Aiyelawaje, in Porto-Novo, Hotel Alejo in Cotonou and other landmarks in Ketu and other towns. President Thomas BoniYayi, the former leader, is a Yoruba.
We know there are people of Yoruba descents who are now living in Sierra Leone, Ghana and Liberia. I used to have a friend in The Guardian of the 1980s. George Ola Davies from Liberia. I explained to him the meaning of his full name, Olabiwonnu and told him his ancestors must have come from Yorubaland. In the 19th Century and early 20th Century, Yoruba civilization and culture was dominant in West Africa. The milieu was called the EekuCivilisation which was signposted by peripatetic preachers of both Christian and Muslim faiths and traders. Eeku is the Yoruba form of greetings.
YORUBA IN THE DIASPORA
During the Yoruba Wars of the 19th Century, millions of youths were forcibly uprooted from their fatherland and sold into slavery. They were transported mostly to Europe, North America, South America and the Caribbean Islands. The wars were fought with uncivil ferocity leading to the destructions and evacuation of many towns and cities. Cities like Ikoyi, Ijaiye, Owu and many others were destroyed and many of their population sold into slavery. The Civil Wars was sparked off in 1817 by the rebellion of Afonja, the Are OnaKakanfo, the leading Marshall of Oyo Imperial Army, whose intransigence forced his overlord, the Alaafin, to commit ritual suicide. Not mollified by that, he proclaimed his independence only for him to be killed in 1824 during a violent coup detat executed by jihadists led by Malam Alimi, a Fulani imam who was supported by many Yoruba chieftains, including Balogun Alanamu and Balogun Ajikobi, who were fed up with Afonja alleged high-handedness. At the time of the armistice organized by the colonial government of Lagos in 1896, more than 500,000 Yoruba troops were under arms.
By this time, new settlements have been built like new Oyo, Ibadan and Abeokuta and old settlements like Ede, Osogbo and Ogbomosho have been transformed by the influx of refugees. One significant new settlement was Modakeke, peopled who trooped to the ancient land of Ile-Ife. Modakeke was to remain for many generations a sore reminder of the Yoruba Civil Wars. The impact of the Yoruba Wars was even more evident outside Africa. Able bodied men and women were seized, and sold in the slave markets of Eko (now Lagos), Ajase (now Porto-Novo) and Agbadarigi (now Badagry). To show that they knew the severity of what they were doing, the slave market in Lagos by the Marina was named OjaOdaju, the market of the heartless. Therefore, we have descendants of those who were forcibly taken away to foreign land who are actually of Yoruba descent but may not be aware of that fact. Yoruba blood flows in their veins, but many of them have lost all traces of home. These are the Yoruba in the Diaspora.
YORUBA OF THE DIASPORA
The Yoruba of the Diaspora are those who know they are Yoruba. They voluntarily travelled abroad, mostly to study and as economic refugees, who believe that at the right time, they would return home. In August 2000, I attended a Sunday service at The Apostolic Faith Church in Chicago where I was a guest of my friend, Mr. DapoAjanaku. One man who was seated by my side was praying fervently, Olorunmajekinkusiluyi o!! Since the seizure of Lagos Island by the British in 1862, and later the abolition of the notorious Slave Trade, millions of Yoruba have voluntarily travelled abroad. Most of them have also voluntarily returned. However, since the economic downturn that began in 1983, many of our people have become permanent refugees in foreign land. These categories of people are now witnessing second and third generations of Yoruba abroad. Many of them still bear Yoruba surnames, but apart from that, they seem lost. To worsen the matter, many young people, believing wrongly that there is no hope, have fled abroad. Some have paid huge sum to travel by road across the Sahara Desert to confront the peril of the ever-hungry Mediterranean Sea.
WEALTH OF YORUBALAND
Available statistics from the Central Bank of Nigeria, CBN, and other sources indicate that Yorubaland in Nigeria is the richest part of the country. Look at in absolute terms, it seems good. However, the truth is that Yorubaland is almost as poor as any other part of the country. Lagos, which controls most of the currency in circulation, is the area distorting the statistics. Youths between ages 18 to 35, constitute about half of the population. They are mostly unemployed, unemployable, underemployed or misemployed. For these young people, the prognosis of the future is not good. We have a duty to change our story. The truth is that the wealth of the Yorubaland is in the Yoruba people all over the world. Until we are able to think in a universal term that would encompasses the whole of Yorubaland, both within and outside Nigeria, we would not be able to harness our full strength. The Yoruba are the hope of the Black race. If we get it right, then the Black race would be redeemed. If not, Africans would remain the poorest part of humanity living in the richest portion of the earth.
WHAT IS TO BE DONE?
We have to harness the full power of the Yoruba people all over the world for the development of Yorubaland. We need to let the Blacks all over the world know that Yorubaland is home to them and that Ile-Ife is the centre of that home. Africans in the Diaspora should be encouraged to come and we should be willing and ready to receive them. In the late 19th and early 20th Century, many Africans in the Diaspora were willing to return home in Africa. Indeed, the Jamaican pan-Africanist, Marcus Garvey, started the Back to Africa Movement which yielded a lot of results. His campaign that Africans should return to Africa was received with alarm and hostilities by the Whites.
For us in Yorubaland, many of the freed slaves and descendants returned home. One of them was the great Bishop Ajayi Crowther, the first African Bishop. He decided to translate the Christian Bible to the Yoruba language, using his native Oyo dialect which today has become the standard modern Yoruba. Many of these returnees participated in the closing years of the Yoruba Wars. The leader of the Ekiti Parapo Society in Lagos, Mr. Doherty was originally from Ijero Ekiti. Prince Adedeji Haastrup, the leader of the Ijesha in Lagos returned to Ilesha after the war in 1886 and later became Oba Ajimoko, the OwaObokun of Ijeshaland. Many of these returnees returned to Abeokuta a town where many of the early Christian missionaries found welcome. However, a group of Ekiti returnees who believed they were being discriminated against left Abeokuta and returned home to form a new town called Aisegba (We are not Egba). The town is now part of Gbonyin local government of Ekiti State.
All these people like the great Candido Da Rocha, AbiolaAgbebi, Gureje Thompson, the founder of Eti Oni town in Atakumosa local government area of Osun State, the great historian, Samuel Johnson and many others contributed greatly to the growth of Yorubaland and Nigeria. However, by the middle of the 20th Century returning home to Africa was regarded as a poorer option for Africans in the Diaspora. Now it is time to change. There are three steps to we have to take to change our story.
CREATE A CENTRAL AUTHORITY
When Chief Obafemi Awolowo became the Leader of Government Business following the coming into force of the Macpherson Constitution, he became the first Yoruba person to rule most of Yorubaland since the princes departed from Ile-Ife at the dawn of time. In 1958 at the London Constitutional Conference, Chief Awolowo and his Action Group party proposed two amendments to the Constitution. That the Ilorin and Kabba Province in the Northern Region which is populated by the Yoruba people should be merged with the Western Region. That the Lagos Federal Capital Territory populated by the Yoruba should be merged with the West. Both proposals were rejected by delegates from the North and East and Awolowo came home empty handed. To add insult to injury, the Western Region was the only one that was Balkanized when the Mid-Western Region was created in 1963. In 1967, General Yakubu Gowon created the 12 states structure, leaving the West as it was with the excising of some of the provinces to join the Federal capital Territory of Lagos to form Lagos State.
The Yoruba of the North were given a new state called the West Central State. Later the state was renamed Kwara State. Today, the old West now has eight states namely, Delta, Edo, Ekiti, Lagos, Ogun Oyo, Osun and Ondo States. The job that once belonged to only one Premier is now being done by eight governors. Instead of one Parliament, we now have eight. Instead of 16 regional ministers, we now have at least 300 commissioners and special advisers. I dare say that there is no indication that we are now being better governed than we were when we had only one Premier instead of eight governors. We could ask ourselves if Papa Awolowo had being the governor of only Ogun State instead of being Premier of the West whether he could have functioned better. The truth is that if that had been the case, our history would have been different. Some of our leaders, agitated by this scenario, have asked that Nigeria be restructured so that we could have six or eight regional bodies as the federating units. I am not going to go into that. However, I would dare say that it would take a long time for the whole of Nigeria to agree at the same time to restructure Nigeria along regional lines. Indeed, politicians of the two major political parties have been speaking from both sides of their mouths about what they consider to be the restructuring of Nigeria. They are yet to properly define it in their manifestoes.
We should be prepared to hear the old songs again by 2023. I would like to advocate that the Yoruba leadership should create a Central Regional Authority that would be in charge of activities across all the Yoruba states. This bodies would be legislated into existence by the Houses of Assembly of the Yoruba State. It should be a body whose existence would not contradict the provisions of the present Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. I do not see any contradiction that would arise from formalizing cooperation among two or more of the present states in the country. Indeed, if the introduction of Sharia Law could not undermine the Constitution, I do not see how unity of some of the states for the betterment of our lives would become an obstacle to the Constitution. The body I am advocating should be used to coordinate activities with the Yoruba of the old North in Kogi and Kwara States and those in Yorubaland outside Nigeria in Benin Republic. The body should have fund provided for it by laws passed by the Houses of Assembly. The body should have access to and coordinate activities of Yoruba groups all over the world especially those in Europe, the Americas, Asia, the Middle-East and the Caribbean islands. Within Nigeria here, the Regional Authority should be in charge of inter-state infrastructural development of the Yoruba states.
There should be major inter-state highways linking all the state capitals: Lagos, Abeokuta, Ibadan, Oshogbo, Akure, Ado-Ekiti, Lokoja and Ilorin. We should also link these state capitals with modern rail lines. It is time we take a deliberate decision to build another railway line apart from the old one built by the colonial government. We should also develop our coastal and water ways for transportation and other usage.
THE YORUBA LANGUAGE
The Yoruba language is the greatest treasure we inherited from our ancestors. For thousands of years, the language, with its various dialects, has been handed over from generation to generation. It is our duty to pass it on to future generations. It is indeed therefore very sad that many Yoruba of this generation, out of deep ignorance and abiding inferiority complex, have neglected the study of our language. Indeed, in many homes, especially among the half-educated elites, they pretend to speak some kind of English to their children, ignoring and neglecting the mother tongue. Sadly, we are ending up with children who could neither speak good English and are also deprived of their mother tongue. This indeed is double jeopardy. Governments of the Yoruba States should pass laws making Yoruba the language of instructions in all primary and secondary schools. English should be treated as one of the subjects to be used and not a language of instructions. It is proven scientifically that children, if properly taught, could learn up to eight languages. Indeed, the late Kofi Anan, the first African to be elected Secretary General of the United Nations, was fluent in more than eight languages.
My friend, Prince Bisi Olatilo, the Managing Director of Biscon Television and one of Nigeria’s most eminent broadcasters, is fluent in all the three major languages of Nigeria. MajorGeneral Ike Nwachukwu, Nigerian former Minister of Foreign Affairs, also speaks Yoruba, Igbo and Hausa fluently. Dr Yemi Ogunbiyi, Chairman of Tanus Communications Ltd and former Managing Director of the old Daily Times who is also a chief of Ile-Ife, speaks the three main Nigerian languages fluently. Therefore, it does not serve any practical purpose to say your children can only speak Nigerian English. Today, children in England are learning French, German, Chinese and Russian. Officers of the Metropolitan Police in London, are learning Yoruba and other African languages because of new dimensions to international crimes in which some of our people are involved. This is one aspect in which the Regional Authority should be involved. The body should help set up schools among Yoruba communities in Europe, the Americas and the Caribbean. Our children, wherever they may be in the world, should have the opportunity of learning in their native tongue. We would not be the first to do this in the world. The Russians, Germans, Chinese, Arabs and Japanese are all doing it. As of now, the Gulen Movement of Turkey have more than 1000 Turkish schools in Europe, Africa, the United States, Brazil and other countries. They have at least three schools in Nigeria.
If the Regional Authority is intent on creating Yoruba schools all over the world, it would generate at least 100,000 jobs for our youths who would have to travel all to other countries to teach in those schools. As of today, because we deprive ourselves of the capacity to act, many of the second and third generation Yoruba living in foreign countries have no intention of coming back home. Yet this is where we need them.
TAKING CHARGE
We should take charge of our land instead of giving excuses that Abuja is disturbing us or putting obstacles on our ways. Mahatma Gandhi, the great Indian liberator was asked whether Indians were capable of gaining independence from Great Britain. He said “the problem of India is not Great Britain. The problem of India is the Indians.”Then he declared: “When Indians are ready to be free, nobody can stop them.” Nobody is stopping us from creating our own Regional Authority. Nobody is stopping us from re-creating our educational system to serve the peculiar needs of our people. Nobody is stopping us from constructing regional super-highways to link all our state capitals. Nobody is stopping us from building our own rail lines or coordinating our farming to become the backbone of our economy as it was in the first Republic.
We have to build new cities and provide electricity to power our industries and light our communities. All these we have to do ourselves because nobody would do them for us. Our people during the First Republic were not blaming Prime-Minister Abubakar Tafawa Balewa for their woes. They knew they were the masters of their collective destiny. When we make Yorubaland attractive, tourists would come. Africans all over the world, especially in the Americas, would know that this land of Oduduwa and Orunmila is their home. They would come here, not just as tourists, but as natives returning to the land of their ancestors. No date could be better suited to start this new Back to Africa Movement than the period of Olojo Festival, a festival established by our forefathers to commemorate the First Dawn when Olodumare created the heavens and the earth. That we have a festival to celebrate and a date to commemorate shows that the ancestors did their duty. Now let us do our duty for we are the ancestors of the future.
I appreciate your attention. Thank You.

This Lecture Was Delivered On Wednesday September 18, 2019*

Yoruba Words for Professions

Mọlémọlé--- builder/bricklayer
Awakọ̀--- driver
Ayàwòrán--- artist
Atọ́kọ̀ṣe--- motor mechanic
Aránṣọ--- tailor
Onídìrí--- hair plaiter/hairdresser
Onígbàjámọ̀--- barber
Agbedede-- (can't make sense of this without accents)

https://twitter.com/yoruba_proverbs/status/1181137574510903297?s=09

Jooo CHIEFTANCY TITLE O!- YEYE OLOJA-ASA FOR ME! OLODUMARE OTI SE OOOO!

https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1019145141602296&id=100005204594038&set=a.1018608974989246&sfnsn=mo

Nigerian bags 3first-Class Degrees at 23years of Age oooo! From face2faceafrica.com

https://face2faceafrica.com/article/heard-of-the-nigerian-student-who-bagged-3-first-class-degrees-including-one-from-cambridge-university-at-age-23

MALCOLM X Speaks--Separation oooo!

Face2Face Africa

Read Malcolm X’s 1963 speech he delivered on this day advocating racial separation for African Americans
October 11, 2019 at 11:00 am | HISTORY

FRANCIS AKHALBEY | Staff Writer

Malcolm X -- Photo credit: Tullio Saba
On this day in 1963, Malcolm X, who was then a member of the Nation of Islam, addressed an audience at the University of California in Berkeley.

In his speech, he touched on black nationalism, which is a Nation of Islam ideology, as well as racial separatism, explaining why the latter was necessary and crucial in solving the plight of African Americans.

Read a part of the speech below:

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Our people in the Negro community are trapped in a vicious cycle of ignorance, poverty, disease, sickness, and death. There seems to be no way out. No way of escape. The wealthy, educated Black bourgeoisie, those uppity Negroes who do escape, never reach back and pull the rest of our people out with them. The Black masses remain trapped in the slums.

And because there seems to be no hope or no other escape, we turn to wine, we turn to whiskey, and we turn to reefers, marijuana, and even to the dreadful needle – heroin, morphine, cocaine, opium – seeking an escape.

Many of us turn to crime, stealing, gambling, prostitution. And some of us are used by the white overlords downtown to push dope in the Negro community among our own people. Unemployment and poverty have forced many of our people into a life of crime. But the real criminal is in the City Hall downtown, in the State House, and in the White House in Washington, D.C. The real criminal is the white liberal, the political hypocrite. And it is these legal crooks who pose as our friends, force us into a life of crime, and then use us to spread the white man’s evil vices in our community among our own people.

The Honorable Elijah Muhammad teaches us that our people are scientifically maneuvered by the white man into a life of poverty. Because we are forced to live in the poorest sections of the city, we attend inferior schools. We have inferior teachers and we get an inferior education. The white power structure downtown makes certain that by the time our people do graduate, we won’t be equipped or qualified for anything but the dirtiest, heaviest, poorest-paying jobs. Jobs that no one else wants.

We are trapped in a vicious cycle of economic, intellectual, social, and political death. Inferior jobs, inferior housing, inferior education which in turn again leads to inferior jobs. We spend a lifetime in this vicious circle. Or in this vicious cycle going in circles. Giving birth to children who see no hope or future but to follow in our miserable footsteps.

So we thank God for the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. We who are Muslims saw no way out until we accepted the religion of Islam and the spiritual guidance of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. We saw no solution to our problems. We saw no real leader among our people.

But today the whole world is talking about the Honorable Elijah Muhammad and the divine solution he received from the God of our forefathers. Not your God but from the God of our forefathers. Not a temporary solution which will benefit only the hand-picked upper-class Negroes, but a solution divinely designed to solve the plight of the Black masses in this country permanently and forever.

The government does not want our people to listen and understand the solution that God has given the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. The government is against Mr. Muhammad because the government is against our God. In order to trick our people away from God’s true solutions, the government is trying to deceive our people with a false solution, a phony solution, a deceitful solution called token integration. I may add, whenever you get on the bus or the subway or the streetcar and you have to use a token, that token is not the real thing but it is a substitute for the real thing. And wherever you have a token, you have a substitute. And wherever you have token integration, you don’t have anything but a substitute for integration and there’s no real integration anywhere in North America — North, South, East, or West, not even in San Francisco, Oakland, or Berkeley.

Has the government effort to bribe our people with token integration made our plight better; or has it made it worse? When you tried to integrate the white community in search of better housing, the whites there fled to the suburbs. And the community that you thought would be integrated soon deteriorated into another all-Black slum. What happened to the liberal whites? Why did they flee? We thought that they were supposed to be our friends. And why did the neighborhood deteriorate only after our people moved in?

It is the tricky real estate agents posing as white liberal friends who encourage our people to force their way into white communities, and then they themselves sell these integrated houses at such high prices that our people again are forced to take in roomers to offset the high house notes. This creates in the new area the same overcrowded conditions, and the new community soon deteriorates into the same slum conditions from which we thought we had escaped. The only one who has benefited is the white real estate agent who poses as our friend, as a liberal, and who sells us the house in a community destined by his own greedy schemes to become nothing but a high-priced slum area.

Today our people can see that integrated housing has not solved our problems. At best it was only a temporary solution. One in which only the wealthy, hand-picked Negroes found temporary benefit.

After the 1954 Supreme Court desegregation decision, the same thing happened when our people tried to integrate the schools. All the white students disappeared into the suburbs. Now the caliber of what our people thought was to be an integrated school has fallen to the same level of the slum school from which we thought we had escaped. Just as efforts to integrate housing failed miserably, efforts to integrate schools have been an even more miserable failure.

Having failed to get integrated housing and failed to get integrated schools’ now the Negro leaders are demanding integrated jobs. That is they are demanding a certain quota, or percentage, of white people’s jobs.

First the Negro leadership demanded the white man’s house, and the whites vacated their run-down houses for us and built new homes for themselves out in the suburbs. Then the Negro leaders demanded seats for our children in the white man’s schools. The whites evacuated the schools as our children moved in and they built modern schools for themselves in the suburbs. But now the Negro leadership is demanding the white man’s job. Can the whites vacate their jobs like they did their homes and their schools and move to the suburbs and create more jobs ? No. Not without violence and bloodshed. The same white liberals who used to praise our people for their patient nonviolent approach have now become openly impatient and violent themselves in defense of their own jobs. Not only in the South but also in the North. Even here in the Bay Area.

For thirty-three years the Honorable Elijah Muhammad has been warning us that the time would come when the white man would not have enough jobs for himself much less enough jobs for our people. So the present demand of our people for more of the white man’s jobs must lead to violence and bloodshed. It may even lead to a race war – a bloody race war. And it is the government itself that is now pressing the people of this country into a racial blood bath.

But the white man is misjudging the times and he is underestimating the American so-called Negro because we’re living in a new day. Our people are now a new people. That old Uncle Tom-type Negro is dead. Our people have no more fear of anyone, no more fear of anything. We are not afraid to go to jail We are not afraid to give our very life itself. And we’re not afraid to take the lives of those who try to take our lives. We believe in a fair exchange.

We believe in a fair exchange. An eye for an eye. A tooth for a tooth. A head for a head and life for a life. If this is the price of freedom, we won’t hesitate to pay the price.

By trying to oppose the divine solution that God has given to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, the American government will actually provoke another Civil War. That is, this government – and especially that present administration in Washington, D.C. — will provoke a civil war among whites by trying to force them to give up their jobs and homes and schools to our people. And our people will provoke a race war by trying to take the white man’s jobs and his schools and his home away from him.

This racial dilemma poses a serious problem for white America. Civil war between whites on the one hand, a race war between the whites and their 20 million ex-slaves on the other hand. And the entire dark world is watching, waiting to see what the American government will do to solve this problem once and for all.

We must have a permanent solution. A temporary solution won’t do. Tokenism will no longer suffice. The Honorable Elijah Muhammad has the only permanent solution. Twenty million ex-slaves must be permanently separated from our former slavemaster and placed on some land that we can call our own. Then we can create our own jobs. Control our own economy. Solve our own problems instead of waiting on the American white man to solve our problems for us.

The Honorable Elijah Muhammad teaches us that on our own land we can set up farms, factories, businesses. We can establish our own government and become an independent nation. And once we become separated from the jurisdiction of this white nation, we can then enter into trade and commerce for ourselves with other independent nations. This is the only solution.

The Honorable Elijah Muhammad says that in our own land we can establish our own agricultural system. We can grow food to feed our own people. We can raise cattle and use the hides, the leather, and the wool to clothe our people. We can dig the clay from the earth and make bricks to build homes for our people. We can turn the trees into lumber and furnish the homes for our own people.

He says that we can dig the natural resources from the earth once we are in our own land. Land is the basis of all economic security. Land is essential to freedom, justice, and equality. Land is essential to true independence. And the Honorable Elijah Muhammad says we must be separated from the American white man’ returned to our own land where we can live among our own people. This is the only true solution.

For just as the biblical government of Egypt under Pharaoh was against Moses because Moses had been directed by God to separate the Hebrew slaves from Pharaoh and lead them out of the house of bondage to a land of their own, today this modern house of bondage under the authority of the American government opposes this modern Moses. Opposes the Honorable Elijah Muhammad’s efforts to separate our people, who have been made slaves here in this country, and lead us to a land of our own.

The government opposes the Honorable Elijah Muhammad’s efforts to wake us up, clean us up, and stand us on our own feet so we can follow him out of this house of bondage to our own land where we can live among our own people. Just as the government of biblical Egypt was against the God of the Hebrew slaves, today the American government is against the God of her Negro slaves, the God of our forefathers. And just as that Pharaoh tried to trick the Hebrew slaves into rejecting the offers of salvation from their God by deceiving them with false promises through hired magicians and carefully staged demonstrations like the recent ridiculous march on Washington [the 1963 civil rights march and rally at the Lincoln Memorial], today this government is paying certain elements of the Negro leadership to deceive our people into thinking that we’re going to get accepted soon into the mainstream of American life.

The government is deceiving our people with false promises so we won’t want to return to our own land and people. The government is saying, “Stay here, don’t listen to this Muhammad, we will desegregate the lunch counters and the theaters and the parks and the toilets” – meaning this public accommodation thing where you can sit on a toilet with a white person or in a toilet with a white person.

“We’ll give you more civil rights bills. We won’t give you civil rights, but we’ll give you civil rights bills.” The government promises our people this only to keep you from listening to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad and to stop us from waking up. They know that if we listen to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad long enough, we will begin to do our own thinking. He’ll make us see, hear, think, and able to speak for ourselves.

Whenever you become fed up in this country with the white man’s brutality and you get set to take matters in your own hands in order to defend yourself and your people, the same government – and again I repeat, especially that Catholic administration in Washington, D.C. – tries to pacify our people with deceitful promises of tricky civil rights legislation that is never designed to be a true solution to our problem. Civil rights legislation will never solve our problems. The white liberals are nothing but political hypocrites who use our people as political footballs only to get bills passed that will increase their own power.

The present proposed civil rights legislation will give the present administration dictatorial powers and make America a legal police state, but still won’t solve the race problem. The present administration is only using civil rights as a political football to gain more legislation and power for itself. Our people are being used as pawns in the game of power politics by political hypocrites. They don’t want our people to listen to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad because they know he will make them – make us see them as they really are.

So I say in my conclusion, the Honorable Elijah Muhammad’s message and solution is simple. He says: “Since we are not wanted in this country, let’s pack our bags and go home to our own people, to our own land.” The propaganda of the American government is skillfully designed to make our people think that our people back home don’t want us. Government propagandists tell us constantly, “Africa is a jungle. Africans are savage and backward. They have no modern conveniences and you’re too much like us white folks. How could you live comfortably back there?”

This propaganda is government strategy against the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, realizing that his mission is to teach our people the truth about our own kind, clean us up, and then return us to our own land and unite us with our own people.

The American government turns us against our own kind in order to keep us from making a mass exodus out of this country where we can live at home among our own people.

Therefore, the Honorable Elijah Muhammad says, American propaganda is designed to make us think that no matter how much hell we catch here, we’re still better off in America than we’d be anywhere else. They want us to think we have no place else to go. And many of our so-called intellectuals who pose as our leaders and spokesmen actually believe that we have no place else to go. So their solution to our problem is that we stay here and continue to catch hell from the American white man.

But the only permanent solution is complete separation or some land of our own in a country of our own. All other courses will lead to violence and bloodshed. It will lead to the destruction of America, and it will also lead to the destruction of our people who fall for it. So his message is flee for your lives and save yourselves. And I thank you.

Source: BlackPast, B. (2013, January 22) (1963) Malcolm X, “Racial Separation”. AFRICA
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